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Do Huskies Need a Companion? What Owners Should Know

Do Huskies Need a Companion? What Owners Should Know

Huskies are one of the most sociable, company-loving breeds there are. Because of this, many husky owners at some point think their furry friend may need a constant companion. So let’s find out.

Having a companion will almost always ensure a happier, more content husky, compared to a husky without a companion.

Do huskies need a companion?

Whether it’s another dog or human, your husky will undoubtedly prefer to have company nearly all of the time. If your husky is left alone for too long, it’s possible he’ll develop some level of separation anxiety or isolation distress. (much easier than other breeds)

The history of the Siberian husky explains why they are such a sociable breed. Huskies were bred in packs up to 15 strong, living, working, playing, eating and sleeping all together closely with their human tribe, the Chukchi People.

Huskies lived this way for thousands of years, so it’s no surprise that they still show the strong social companionship needs today.

With that being said, of course, it’s possible to own a single husky without another dog, but what happens when you need to go to work for 8 hours a day? everyday… Will this make your husky happy? A constant companion would be ideal in this situation

So what defines companion? Does your husky need another dog? or are you enough of a companion for him? Let’s take a look!

Do huskies need another dog? or are we enough?

do huskies need another dog?

While professionals do come to the conclusion that some dogs are better in pairs (especially huskies) it is possible to have just one husky, and yourself. As long as your life-situation allows for you to be with him MOST of the day, every day.

There are countless examples of one person, with one husky. And it works just fine. If you are able to give the time, care, and attention to your companionship-craving husky, he’ll be happy and extremely content.

So technically the answer is no, your husky does not necessarily need another dog, as long as you can fill that companionship gap.

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The benefits of getting another dog for your husky

Although you can fill the companionship gap for your lone husky, it still doesn’t mean that you would necessarily be better than another canine companion.

It’s in your husky’s genes to be in a park, and while he likely considers his human family to be his pack, another canine friend would certainly be well received.

Keeping each other entertained

Your husky’s natural craving for companionship will be easily met by having a second husky/dog buddy to be around, all of the time. He will have another dog to play with, communicate and bond with. Having another husky or dog to play with all the time will mean more exercise and stimulation. Exactly what huskies need to be happy and content.

Reduce loneliness and separation anxiety

By having another dog, you’ll significantly decrease the chances of your husky developing separation anxiety or isolation distress. Both of which are easily developed with huskies. A second dog buddy will provide emotional support if you are out of the house for a while, and will keep your husky more at ease.

Training a second puppy will be easier

When you get a second puppy, the first dog, as long as you have already trained him will show the puppy how it’s done. It’s typical that a new puppy will follow an already house-trained dog very closely. She’ll see him go outside to poop and chew only his toys as well as obeying commands. All of these things are super important, and your previously trained dog will speed up the training process of a new puppy.

Getting another dog for the right reason

Despite having just said everything above. Some people strongly argue that you should not get another dog just to give your first dog company. To be honest, I personally think you can have any reason you like for getting a second dog as long as you are ready for what that entails.

Getting another dog is just as important as getting your first one. A second dog shouldn’t take the back seat or vice versa. One dog is a big enough commitment as it is, so if you really want two, you MUST make sure you are able to really handle that, and give BOTH dogs exactly what they need and more.

What dogs do huskies get along with?

do huskies need another dog

A husky, for your husky, is the best option. However, huskies can be quite a handful. It’s understandable that many people may look into a different breed when considering getting a second dog. So, what dogs do huskies get along with the most?

It’s important to understand some basic husky characteristics to know what kind of dog will work best with a husky.

Prey drive
Huskies have a very big prey drive which means they do not naturally get along well with small animals like cats, rabbits, birds, hamsters, and tiny dogs! Anything that is significantly smaller than them, they may view as a chew toy, or worse, lunch.

Disclaimer* It is entirely possible to train a husky to live harmoniously with a tiny dog, or even a cat! However, this takes a lot of serious training and supervision. If you’re looking to get your husky a new best friend. This would be taking a long and difficult way (with no guarantees).

Rough play
Huskies love playing rough, so it’s important to choose a breed that enjoys this kind of play just as much. If you were to get a breed that doesn’t enjoy rough-play, it could be taken the wrong way when your husky bounds up to them. This would be a repeating nightmare.

Here are some of the breeds that typically do well with most huskies. There are always exceptions, and this comes down to personality which can change from dog to dog.

Here’s a list compiled from what many Siberian husky owners say

  • Siberian Husky (the best option)
  • Alaskan Malamute
  • German Shepherd
  • Golden Retrievers
  • Labradors
  • Australian Shepherd Dog
  • Dalmation
  • Boxers
  • Rhodesian ridgeback

The list contains more, but these are the common winners. What makes these dogs compatible? They are all similar in size, just as energetic with speed and desire to play.

All dogs react differently when introduced to another dog, raising two dogs from pups will be the easiest option.

Always be careful and vigilant when introducing a new dog, adult or puppy to your household where you already have a dog. While huskies are not particularly possessive over their owners or space, caution still needs to be taken.

I have a full article dedicated to the most compatible breeds for a husky. You can check that out here.

Do huskies have separation anxiety?

Huskies are a breed known for developing separation anxiety under certain conditions. They are a breed that loves company, whether it’s from humans or from another dog, they love to have a friend close by.

If you leave your husky alone for many hours every day, the chances of him developing either separation anxiety or isolation distress significantly increases.

Both of these conditions are different and the severity also varies. In the worst case, it can become so severe that medication is required to calm him and this is truly a sad place for your husky or any dog to be in.

How long can you leave a husky alone?

A common situation we find ourselves in is needing to leave our dog home alone for a while. It may be a one-off occasion, or you may already be doing this regularly.

A lot of people want to know a specific number, “how many hours can I leave my husky alone?” Well, It’s not that simple, and there is no correct number of hours. This depends on your husky. Some huskies will be fine left alone for 1 or 2 two hours, some will be able to handle more, and there will be some huskies that will whine and cry if you’re gone for 10 minutes.

One thing for sure is that any Siberian husky would rather not be left alone. Having a companion, be it another dog or human when you’re not around is the answer.

I have a complete article all about leaving a husky home alone. This is very important to know if you have a single husky and a full-time job where you have to leave them alone on a daily basis.

When to get a second dog?

If you are considering getting a second dog for your husky, you may be wondering when’s the best time to do this.

If you don’t have any dog yet, and you know that you are always away from home traveling or working then perhaps getting a dog in the first place isn’t actually the best idea.

However, if you already have a dog, and you’re needing to leave him home alone already, then don’t wait any longer. Help your dog now and get him a new buddy.

Generally speaking, professionals advise that getting a second dog when your resident dog is already over 1 year old, is the safest bet. This is because your resident dog is likely already house trained and accustomed to you. This can make handling two dogs easier if one of them is already obedient and obeying your commands.

Last thoughts

Huskies do need a companion, preferably another dog, even better, another husky. Although, if you are not in a position to get another dog, that’s ok. You just need to make sure you that YOU are able to give your husky the attention he needs.

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My two favorite brushes for a beautiful coat are a simple Undercoat Rake and a Slicker Brush. These brushes when used together will de-shed and maintain your husky’s coat better than anything else.

Best Online Training Program For Huskies

Brain Training For Dogs has become very popular with Siberian Huskies in the last few years. Owners that have tried it say amazing things about the incredible results and how easily implemented the training is.

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If you would like to support My Happy Husky directly and have an easy to read and entertaining guide for training your husky puppy, check out my book The Husky Puppy Handbook on Amazon. All purchases are greatly appreciated.

Check out more breed information on huskies here: Siberian Husky Breed Info here.

Disclaimer

The advice given in this article is for educational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice in any context. Before making any decisions that may affect the health and/or safety of your dog, you should always consult a trained veterinarian in your local area. For the FULL disclaimer Visit Here


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