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5 Ways To Get a Husky Puppy Sleeping The Whole Night

Owners of new husky puppies quickly have questions about their pup’s sleeping habits!

Most notably, when their husky puppy will finally sleep throughout the whole night, and how to help them sleep better.

In this article you’ll learn about:

  • When husky puppies usually start sleeping throughout the whole night
  • How to help your puppy sleep throughout the night
  • Where is the best place for your puppy to sleep
  • How to handle potty break during the night

Let’s get into it!

When Do Husky Puppies Sleep Throughout The Whole Night

Puppies typically begin sleeping throughout the whole night from 16 weeks onwards. Younger puppies at 8 weeks old will usually sleep for around 6-10 hours.

The main reason why younger puppies wake up:

  • They need a toilet break
  • They want attention
  • They are still a bit scared/fearful
  • Getting used to their new environment
  • They sleep a lot during the day!

Some puppies will indeed be able to settle into a good sleeping pattern sooner than 16 weeks, but this is fairly uncommon.

Most pup owners will have a little trouble up to this point!

How Well Do Puppies Sleep at 12 Weeks?

At 12 weeks old, most puppies will be sleeping around 8-10 hours per night, almost a full night’s sleep. Sometimes your puppy will sleep the whole night, and others they’ll wake up.

This would have happened due to feeling more comfortable in their new home, they now understand they have support from you and the family, plus their bladder will be bigger! Which certainly helps.

5 Ways to Help a Husky Puppy Sleep at Night

There are certain ways in which you can help your puppy sleep longer at night.

New puppies need sleep just like babies and young children do. Sleep is crucial for proper physical and mental development so putting the effort in to help your puppy sleep should be a top priority.

Here are 5 tips that can help your puppy sleep longer and better at night

1. Physical and mental stimulation before sleeping

To ensure your puppy is ready for sleep, make sure they have been properly stimulated in the last 2-3 hours prior to going to sleep.

Physical and mental stimulation will use their remaining energy and set them up for bedtime.

For physical stimulation, take them out for their exercise in the evening time, 2-3 hours before they go to sleep. If your puppy doesn’t receive enough exercise, this will certainly lead to a build-up of energy, making them unable to sleep.

For mental stimulation, you can implement some basic training sessions 2 hours before bed. Things like teaching your puppy how to sit, wait, play, and drop will use significant amounts of mental energy, leaving them tired and satisfied.

2. No food or drink directly before bed

Another huge tip that owners mustn’t ignore is to stop all food and drink at least 2 hours before bed, ideally 3 hours.

This will allow your puppy to digest most of their dinner while awake, leading to a more restful sleep.

Plus, no water will help their small bladder from needing to release throughout the night.

So with this in mind, have your puppy eat their dinner a few hours before bedtime, encourage one last drink of water, then remove both bowls. That’s it, nada mas!

Encourage plenty of potty breaks before bed and your pup is ready for a good sleep.

3. Use calming music

Believe it or not, your puppy finds classical music very calming! If you don’t have any classical music to hand, you can check out music on Youtube like this one The Dog Song – Music to Help Your Dog Sleep.

This is completely free, on Youtube, and has been made with certain beats per minute to help calm down your puppy ready for sleep.

There really has been extensive research put into this! PetMD has a great article with the studies.

Dogs seem to relax the most when listening to music with 50-60 beats per minute, very common to classical music, reggae, and some types soft rock – according to Dr. Christie Cornelius, founder, Senior Paws & Last Wishes

4. Use a crate overnight

Crates are a great way to help your puppy feel secure and comfortable when alone or asleep. There may be some struggles with the initial crate training, but after that, they’ll feel protected and calm.

To help your puppy adjust to the crate, be sure to introduce it to them slowly so they can become familiar with it, before being kept inside.

To make the crate more inviting you can also try:

  • Use a blanket over the top of the crate
  • Ensure you have a soft blanket inside the crate
  • Have the crate in a quiet, dim area of the room
  • Use a comforting toy like the Snuggle Puppy inside the crate

Dr. Carolyn Lincoln is a vet, dog trainer, and owner of Play to Behave and she recommends having the crate by your bed to start with, guide them into the crate a little before you go to sleep and darken the room. After a short while, turn the lights off and sleep.

Your puppy knows they are right next to you and this will help keep them calm and reassured while in the crate. They will sense that you are sleeping and will do the same.

5. Use the Snuggle Puppy!

The Snuggle Puppy Behavioral Aid Toy is an amazing teddy-style toy that helps to calm down and reassure puppies through warmth and a heartbeat-like sensation.

There is a neat little heart-shaped button that goes inside the teddy and after pressing, gives off a pulse-like sensation for 8 hours. There is also a heat pack that gives off a safe amount of heat.

Both the sensation of the heartbeat and the warmth mimic a real companion for your young puppy throughout the night. This reassurance has been shown to significantly increase the quality and length of sleep in many puppies.

This amazing teddy has over four hundred positive reviews on Chewy.com This is definitely something to consider! Check out the Snuggle Puppy Here

Where Should Your Husky Puppy Sleep at Night?

There are many opinions surrounding where the best/most appropriate place for your puppy to sleep is.

So, where should my puppy sleep at night? Where your puppy sleeps at night is up to you as the owner.

If you are comfortable having your puppy sleep in your bedroom, this will likely help them sleep while they’re young and is advised, especially from the first day of bringing them home.

It is advised not to let your puppy sleep on or in the bed with you. This will lead to them expecting they can do this every time and can lead to behavior issues when they grow up.

The best of both…

A lot of puppy owners have success using a dog crate beside their bed while they are young puppies, gradually moving the crate further away as they grow up until finally, your puppy is sleeping in another room.

If you do not have a crate, the next best option is to use a towel on the floor close by your bed. Just be aware that your puppy may get up to during the night for a toilet break.

Should I Wake My Puppy Up To Pee During The Night?

Toilet breaks throughout the night are something you can’t escape from with young puppies…

But you should never be the one to disturb or wake up your puppy from sleep, unfortunately, it has to be the other way around!

Puppies have small bladders and will certainly need a toilet break during the night. As they get older, they will be able to hold their bladder for much longer.

To reduce toilet breaks you can do a couple of things…

Firstly, make sure your puppy doesn’t eat any food, treats, or drinks water 2 hours before bedtime. This will result in better sleep and fewer potty breaks.

Secondly, after giving your puppy a small amount of playtime an hour before bed, lead them outside to their designated toilet area and wait until they go. A small amount of playtime 1 hour before bedtime will use up some extra energy and will also encourage them to go for a pee afterward.

How Much Should a Husky Puppy Sleep Anyway?

It’s very common for puppies to sleep up to 18-20 hours per day, depending on their breed.

When it comes to daytime habits, puppies have big bursts of energy, followed by a nap which can last anywhere between 30 minutes to a couple of hours.

You will soon find out that your new puppy sleeps much more than you anticipated throughout the day! So if you have a new puppy and are currently concerned by them sleeping so much… Just remember, this is completely normal in new puppies.


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Disclaimer

The advice given in this article is for educational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice in any context. Before making any decisions that may affect the health and/or safety of your dog, you should always consult a trained veterinarian in your local area. For the FULL disclaimer Visit Here


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